Q&A: Ross Robbins

I would be most inclined to compare my poetry to some really self-consciously horny gay indie rock. I don’t intend it to come across that way, but it seems like I talk about my genitals a lot more than most poets.

Q&A: Dena Rash Guzman

I think now and then I manage to take a piece and rock the mic like a vandal, but one of my favorite forms of collaboration is to write a poem and hand it as a script to a filmmaker.

Language Play by Leah Umansky

What I’m drawn to is not only the beauty of rhythmic language, but the pacing itself. In my own work, I’m always stealing from the work of other writers, from their diaries, from newspapers, and from bits of conversation that I overhear. Most of what I’m stealing relates to sound: rhythm, rhyme, tone and word choice.

Driftsaid by Peter Milne Greiner

My other friend, Andrew, says that the dictionary does not define words, our sensibilities as poets do. Which is sort of why I think it’s important to mispronounce quay and forte because if you don’t, well, confusion will ensue. But what’s wrong with that. Do with meaning what you do with sound. Alter it slightly.

Q&A: Lauren Hunter

I haven’t really had to rail against traditional/popular styles, but as a listener, I certainly rail against it. Your poem will, yes, speak for itself on the page. It should. But if I’m watching you read, you better be speaking for your poems. It’s your job to bring me inside of them. It’s your job to make me care.